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International School of Crystallography - Erice

logo iscoc

Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture
President: Professor Antonino Zichichi

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL of CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

Director: Sir Tom Blundell, FRS FMedSci

53rd Course:

MAGNETIC
CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

Erice 31 May - 9 june 2019

Directors of the course:

B.J. Campbell

B.J. Campbell

Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US

M.T. Fernandez Diaz

M.T. Fernandez-Diaz

Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

J.M. Perez-Mato

J.M. Perez-Mato

University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, ES

Magnetic Crystallography 2018 logo

Application to Magnetic Crystallography Course deadline:
30 November 2018

Apply

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

Since the first magnetic neutron-diffraction experiments almost 70 years ago (1994 Nobel Prize), magnetic-structure research has grown tremendously within the materials physics, chemistry, and engineering fields (e.g. superconductivity, multiferroics, spintronics, information storage, molecular magnetism). Magnetic degrees of freedom lie at the heart of much of the exciting science being done today at international scattering facilities, and hundreds of magnetic structures are now published every year by a diverse range of research communities. In response to this progress, the crystallographic community is also rapidly developing and delivering new infrastructure with which to solve, refine, analyze and describe magnetic structures. Where chaos once reigned, consensus and remarkable new tools have emerged.

The School will address key advances in magnetic-structure research, as well as the foundational and state-of-the-art of theoretical, experimental, and computational capabilities that made these advances possible. The program, which includes both lectures and many hands-on-tutorials, is designed to engage both new and veteran members of the magnetic-structure community. Scientific topics will include:

1) Important magnetic systems and magnetic-structure types (e.g. commensurate and incommensurate, antiferromagnetic, amplitude-modulated, helical, skyrmionic, etc...);

2) The theory and practice of using magnetic symmetry groups (e.g. point groups, space groups, superspace groups, subperiodic groups) and relating them to magnetic physical properties;

3) The complete and unambiguous description of a magnetic structure; comparison of the correct use of wave amplitudes, magnetic supercells, and representational modes; how magnetic symmetry can be used to further constrain any of these descriptions;

4) Advanced instruments and experimental methods for probing magnetic structures;

5) Computational tools for exploring, solving and refining commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures;

6) Computational tools and resources for performing magnetic representational analyses, applying magnetic symmetry groups, and manipulating the description of a magnetic structure;

7) Open-access archives for commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures.


Sponsored by:


SPEAKERS AND TUTORS

M. AVDEEV
ANSTO, Lucas Heights, AU

avdeev Max Avdeev is an instrument scientist responsible for the high-resolution neutron powder diffractometer ECHIDNA at the OPAL research reactor operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). He received PhD for synthesis and crystal structural studies of superionic conductors in 1999. Between 2000 and 2005 he worked as a postdoctoral researcher first at the University of Aveiro (Portugal) and then Argonne National Laboratory (USA). In 2005 he joined ANSTO as a full-time scientist. His main research interests are studies of crystal and magnetic structure of inorganic materials using X-ray and neutron diffraction and atomistic modelling.

L.C. CHAPON
Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK

Chapon Laurent Chapon received is PhD in Montpellier (France) in 2000 and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Argonne National Laboratory (US). In 2002, Laurent moved to the ISIS neutron source (UK) where he worked as an instrument scientist and then leader of the Crystallography group, before joining the ILL (France) as a research fellow and head of the diffraction group. In 2016, Laurent Chapon was appointed director of Physical Sciences at the Diamond Light Source (UK) and visiting Professor at Oxford University. His scientific interests lie in studying the magnetic properties of complex magnetic oxides, mostly multiferroics, frustrated systems, and more recently iridates. Having worked in large scale facilities for the last 18 years, Laurent has extended expertise in neutron scattering, including 3D-polarimetry, and magnetic X-ray scattering as well as magnetic crystallography.

L. ELCORO
University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, ES

Elcoro Luis Elcoro studied Physics at the Universidad Autonoma in Madrid. During his Ph. D. at the University of the Basque Country he focused on the structure determination of quasicrystals under the superspace formalism. Later he extended the use of the superspace to the analysis of families of compounds whose structure details depend on continuous parameters and to the ordered distributions of vacancies. Since 2011 he is one of the developers of the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (BCS). Most of his contributions to the BCS are included in the Magnetic section, devoted to the structure analysis of magnetic structures based on symmetry considerations. At present he is involved in the study of topological insulators using group theory to describe systematically the electronic extended states (band structures). He is also applying the developed methods to the identification of materials that can potentially be topological insulators or semi-metals.

O. FABELO
Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

Fabelo Oscar Fabelo (b. 1978) graduated in Physics at the Universidad de La Laguna, Spain. He did the PhD in the Physics department (2008) at the same University. During this period he was working as technician in the magnetic measurements service of the Universidad de La Laguna, where he took the first contact with the research on magnetism. During the PhD he carried out several stays at Instituto de Ciencia Molecular (ICMol), Valencia (Spain) to improve his background in molecular magnetism. After the PhD from 2009 to 2014, he worked as scientist in the Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Zaragoza (Spain). During this period he was instrument scientist of the neutron powder diffractometer D1B at Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France). Since 2014 he is responsible for the hot-neutron single crystal diffractometer D9 at the ILL.
His research interests are focused on small molecule crystallography, in particular magneto-structural correlations in coordination polymers and hybrid materials. He have an extensive experience on the field of neutron diffraction in both powder and single crystal.

V.O. GARLEA
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, US

Garlea Ovidiu Garlea is instrument scientist at the HYSPEC spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He holds a courtesy appointment with the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University and is adjoint associate professor at the Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering at the University of Tennessee. He received his PhD in solid state physics from Joseph-Fourier University, Grenoble, France in 2001. Since then he has worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, at the Ames Laboratory, and at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. From 2007 until 2013, he served as lead instrument scientist at the HB2A Neutron Powder Diffractometer at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) where he oversaw the installation of the instrument and built a vibrant magnetic diffraction community. He initiated a workshop series on magnetic structure determination that runs regularly since 2009. Starting with 2013, he contributed to the successful commissioning of the HYSPEC spectrometer at the SNS and to the implementation of the neutron polarization analysis capability. His research focuses on studies of frustrated magnets, quantum systems and strongly correlated electron systems using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering technique.

M.I.S. HENRIQUES
CAS Institute of Physics, Prague, CZ

Henriques Margarida Henriques was born in Coimbra, Portugal and graduated in Materials Engineering at the University of Coimbra. She worked as a Materials Engineer before she obtained her PhD degree in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Lisbon, Portugal. Her interest in new magnetic crystallography and electronic properties of new materials lead her for her post-doc work within the group of Structure Analysis of the Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences. She is involved in the development of the magnetic option of Jana2006, which concerns systematic data processing and solution of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures. She also works in synthesis and characterization of new materials containing f-elements using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques under multi-extreme conditions. As a part of this work, she stayed at Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. There she worked as a scientist in the Diffraction group, studying magnetic diffraction in single-crystals of magnetically frustrated materials. Margarida is also involved in the preparation and lecturing in workshops concerning the magnetic option of Jana2006 for scientists and students of worldwide renown neutron facilities and lecturing PhD students in Physics at Charles University in Prague. She is also a member of the Comission for Magnetic Structures of IUCR.

D.D. KHALYAVIN
RAL ISIS Facility, Didcot, UK

Khalyavin Dmitry Khalyavin is a beam-line scientist at the ISIS Facility, pulsed neutron and muon source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Oxford, UK). He is responsible for the high-resolution cold-neutron diffractometer WISH primarily designed to study large unit cell systems and magnetic ordering in solids. Dmitry joined ISIS in 2008 after completion of his postdoctoral activity at University of Aveiro (Aveiro, Portugal) and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia). He got his PhD degree in condensed matter physics at the Institute of Solid State Physics and Semiconductors of National Academy of Science of Belarus (Minsk, Belarus) in 2002. The main research interest is phase transitions and physical crystallography with a particular focus on magnetic structure determination and crystal structure effects associated with magnetic ordering. Dmitry is deeply involved into the ISIS international user scientific program combined with his own strong research scheme in the field of geometrically frustrated magnetism, multiferroics, iron-based superconductors, heavy fermion metals and Kondo semiconductors.

V. PETRICEK
CAS Institute of Physics, Prague, CZ

petricek Václav Petříček studied physics mathematics and physics at the Charles University in Praha. From 1972 till now he works at the Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Praha. During his one year’s stay in Philip Coppens’s lab he wrote the first version of the program Jana for refinement of modulated structures. Nowadays, after 30 years of development, program JANA serves to about 2000 users as a multi-purpose crystallographic package and it receives 300 citations every year. The latest JANA supports also powder diffraction data, simultaneous refinement against various data sets (powders, single crystals) and radiation sources (x-rays, neutrons, electrons), Time-of-Flight neutron diffraction data and refinement of symmetry deformation modes. The latest research of VP is oriented towards magnetic structures, which can be described using the superspace formalism similarly like modulated structures. The “Crystallographic approach” to magnetic structures has attracted many users from the field. VP also collaborates with his colleague Lukas Palatinus on implementation of refinement procedures for electron diffraction tomography data based on the dynamical theory of diffraction.
For his scientific contribution he has been awarded by ICDD Barrett award in 2013 and the ECA Max Perutz prize in 2016.

J. RODRIGUEZ-CARVAJAL
Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

carvajal Juan Rodriguez-Carvajal has a long experience in diffraction physics of neutrons and x-rays. He is an experimentalist with a strong component in computing and theoretical aspects of diffraction. He got his PhD at the University of Barcelona in 1984 and held different teaching positions in two universities of Barcelona. He got a position as a scientist researcher at the CSIC in the Materials Science Institute of Barcelona. From 1988 to 1994 he was Physicist at the ILL. From 1994 to 2006 he was working at the LLB and he came back to the ILL to lead the Diffraction Group. He has been involved in large scale projects for developing new neutron sources. He has participated in many committees and selection panels for research projects. He has also a strong activity in training worldwide young researchers through many courses on diffraction and crystallography.
JRC's interests:
1. Data analysis and software development in Crystallography and Diffraction Physics.
2. Theoretical analysis of magnetic Structures. Frustration and low dimensional magnetism.
3. Physics of superconducting oxides, intermetallics, metal-Insulator transitions and magnetic ordering. Structural and magnetic aspects of oxides presenting colossal magnetoresistance, charge, spin and orbital ordering phenomena. Energy materials, and multiferroics.
Author of more than 430 papers in scientific journals and books. The number of article citations is more than 17800 (Web of Science), 28000 (Google Scholar).
"Award for Distinguished Powder Diffractionist" from the International Committee of EPDIC (Warsaw, 2008), Barrett Award 2011 of the Denver X-ray Conference for “exceptional contributions to powder diffraction”. Author of FULLPROF, one of the most used powder diffraction computer programs in the world.

T.J. SATO
Tohoku University, JP

sato Taku J Sato is presently a full professor at Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University (Japan). He obtained his MSc from the Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology (1993), and received his PhD from the Department of Physics, University of Tokyo (1996). In 1996, he became a staff scientist at National Institute for Metals in Tsukuba, Japan, and then in 2004 he moved to University of Tokyo as an associate professor. From 2012, he has been at Tohoku University. His main research interest is nontrivial macroscopic quantum phenomena in quantum spin systems, including topological spin textures in the real space, emergent quasiparticles in the quantum disordered state, and so on. His expertise is neutron scattering, and has been an instrument scientist on various spectrometers including backscattering spectrometer, triple-axis spectrometer, and direct geometry chopper spectrometers. He has been a commission member for the magnetic structures of IUCr from 2011.

H.T. STOKES
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US

Stokes Harold T. Stokes received a PhD in physics in 1977 at the University of Utah where he developed pulsed-NMR double-resonance techniques for studying atomic diffusion in multi-spin crystals. He then spent three years as a post-doc at the University of Illinois applying pulsed NMR to the study of heterogeneous catalysis. In 1981, he joined the faculty in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Brigham Young University. Three years later, he began a career-long collaboration with Dorian Hatch, and later with Branton Campbell, applying computational group-representation theory to the study of structural phase transitions in crystals. A key product of this effort has been the development of the ISOTROPY Software Suite of online software tools, including the ISODISTORT program. These tools make it possible to conveniently generate and explore the order parameters that arise in phase transitions, and to parameterize them in terms of symmetry modes (basis functions of irreducible representations). The ISOTROPY suite has been a leading contributor of infrastructure for the analysis of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures during the past decade.

R.B. VON DREELE
ANL Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, US

Von Dreele Dr. Von Dreele has a BS Chem. E. (1966), and PhD Inorganic Chem. (1971), from Cornell. He was Professor of Chemistry at Arizona State University (1971-1986) and a NSF postdoctoral fellow at the ICL, Oxford University (1972-3) where he began his pursuit of powder diffraction crystallography. He was at Los Alamos National Laboratory (1986-2003) as Instrument Scientist for two neutron powder diffractometers, a Fulbright Fellow at the ISIS neutron scattering facility (1986), received a Los Alamos National Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award (1998), presented the 5th Joseph Morgan Lecture at Texas Christian University (2000), and a Fellow of the MSA since 2001. In 2003 he joined Argonne National Laboratory with a joint appointment between IPNS and APS; in early 2008 he became full time at the APS. He was President of the ACA (2009), received the Barrett (2009) and Hanawalt Awards (2013).
Since 1985, Dr. Von Dreele has developed the widely used software, GSAS, for analysis of both neutron and x-ray powder diffraction data; this package has been cited more than 8000 times. He is the author of some 150 publications which includes the 1st protein structure solved from x-ray powder diffraction data. Most recently he has been developing GSAS-II, a replacement for GSAS with a fully integrated GUI, display graphics and computational analysis system for diffraction data. His main research interests are the development of x-ray and neutron powder diffraction and its application to a wide variety of scientific problems.

A.S. WILLS
University College London, UK

civalleri bio testo

O. ZAHARKO
Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH

Zaharko Oksana Zaharko (b. 1966) obtained a Master of Science in Solid State Chemistry (1987) and a PhD in Chemistry (1990) from the Lviv State University, Ukraine. She worked as a guest scientist in Laboratories of Crystallography in Warsaw, University of Mainz, ETH Zürich. Since 1998 she works at Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging and is responsible for the single crystal neutron diffractometer ZeBRa (TriCS) at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institut.
Her research interests are frustrated and low-dimensional magnetic systems, and the field of expertise is in neutron scattering and solving complex magnetic structures.

54th Course:

CRYO 3D ELECTRON
MICROSCOPY

Erice 31 May - 9 june 2019

Directors of the course:

D. Hanein

D. Hanein

Sanford Burnham Prebys, La Jolla, CA, US

S. Ludtke

S. Ludtke

Baylor College of Medicine, Huston, TX, US

S. Raunser

S. Raunser

MPI of Molecular Physiology, Dortmund, DE

Cryo 3d Electron microscopy 2018 logo

Application to Cryo 3d Electron Microscopy Course deadline:
30 November 2018

Apply

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

The 54th course will be the inaugural School on 3D CryoEM image analysis at Erice. 3D Cryo-EM image analysis refers to the current practices in image processing and analysis both for single particle analysis and tomography. The School aims to provide a current snapshot of this evolving field, complete with workshops demonstrating state-of-the art software. We plan have tutorials on the major software packages practiced in the field to give participants a solid introduction to the software so they are better prepared to complete a more in-depth tutorial on their own. The sessions will include: deep learning, map improvement , GPU and data storage, cellular tomography, sub-tomogram averaging, phase plate and automated data collection.


Sponsored by:

fei

SPEAKERS AND TUTORS

P. ADAMS
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, US

Adams Paul Adams is a Senior Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an adjunct Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California Berkeley. He also is Vice President for Technology at the Joint BioEnergy Institute and Director of LBNL’s Molecular Biophysics & Integrated Bioimaging Division. He earned his doctorate in biochemistry at the University of Edinburgh and undertook postdoctoral work at Yale University. Dr. Adams’ research focuses on the development of new algorithms and methods for structural biology, structural studies of large macromolecular machines, and development of cellulosic biofuels. He leads the development of the Phenix software, through a collaboration with researchers from Los Alamos National Lab, Duke University and Cambridge University. Phenix is used for the automated solution of macromolecular structures using crystallographic methods, and more recently has been extended to structure solution, refinement and validation of models obtained from electron cryo-microscopy

W. BAUMEISTER
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, DE

Baumeister Wolfgang Baumeister studied biology, chemistry and physics at the Universities of Muenster and Bonn, Germany, and he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Düsseldorf in 1973. From 1973-1980 he was Research Associate in the Department of Biophysics at the University of Duesseldorf. He held a Heisenberg Fellowship spending time at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England. In 1982 he became a Group Leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany and in 1988 Director and Head of the Department of Structural Biology. He is also an Honorary Professor on the Physics Faculty at the Technical University in Munich. In 2000 he spent time at the California Institute of Technology as a Moore Distinguished Scholar.
Wolfgang Baumeister made seminal contributions to our understanding of the structure and function of the cellular machinery of protein degradation, in particular the proteasome. Moreover, he pioneered the development of cryo-electron tomography. His contributions to science were recognized by numerous awards including the Otto Warburg Medal, the Schleiden Medal, the John M. Cowley Medal, the Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine, the Stein and Moore Award, the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology and the Ernst Schering Prize. He is a member of several academies including the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

J.M. CARAZO
Spanish Natl. Center for Biotechnology, Madrid, ES

Carazo I specialize in what has become to be one of the key “Revolutions” in biology in recent times: Cryogenic Electron Microscopy (cryoEM). This cryoEM "revolution" has been made possible by new developments in instrumentation and in image processing and software; it is, precisely, in the area of information processing where our laboratory has excelled. Indeed, we have opened whole new areas in the field, just naming as examples the successful family of Maximum Likelihood algorithms (developed in Madrid from 2007 to 2011), the very much used EMDataBank (started from the European Union “Bioimage” project that I coordinated), or new methods to calculate local resolution in cryoEM maps, all compiled in our software suites XMIPP and SCIPION. Our current efforts focus on the areas of structural validation and flexibility analysis, two of the most demanding topics in our quest to understand at atomic detail the dynamic of large and flexible biological macromolecules. Naturally, structure is one of the ways to understand biological function, to be necessarily complemented by others, a position that explain our continued efforts in information integration, developing widely used environments like 3DBIONOTES. All our new developments are distributed as public software suites, becoming some of the tools that we use in our role as the Image Processing Center of the European Infrastructure for Structural Biology (Instruct ERIC –for European Research Infrastructure Consortium-).

D. CASTAÑO-DÍEZ
Biozentrum, Univ. of Basel, CH

Castaño Daniel Castaño-Díez completed his PhD in Applied Mathematics in Bonn in 2005 with a study on the efficient use of wavelets for representation of surfaces in computer graphics. After moving to EMBL in Heidelbeg, he started working in computational methods for cryo electron tomography, focusing on the use of GPUs for alignment and reconstruction of tomograms. He started the development of the software package Dynamo during his post-doc in the Center for Imaging and Nanoanalytics of the University of Basel (2009-2013). Later, he entered the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in 2014 as joint Head of the Scientific Computing Unit, working on computational infrastructure for the development of image processing algorihtms. Since 2015, he is a Senior Scientist in the BioEM lab of the University of Basel, where he continues the support and extension of the Dynamo software. His research interests are oriented towards the development of numerical methods for high resolution structure determination in in-situ cryoEM and high throughput content analysis of large tomographic data sets.

J. FRANK
HHMI, Columbia University, New York, NY, US

Frank Joachim Frank is a Professor of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and a Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from the Technical University in Munich and, in 1975, joined the Wadsworth Center in Albany as a Senior Research Scientist and, in 1985, joined the faculty of the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the newly founded School of Public Health of SUNY Albany. In 2008 he moved to New York to assume his current positions. Dr. Frank's lab has developed techniques of electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction of biological macromolecules. He has applied this technique of visualization to explore the structure and dynamics of the ribosome during the process of protein synthesis.
Dr. Frank is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Microbiology. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was recently honored for his contributions to the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological molecules and the study of protein synthesis with the 2014 Franklin Medal for Life Science. In 2017 he shared the Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences with Richard Henderson and Marin van Heel, and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Richard Henderson and Jacques Dubochet.

F. FOERSTER
Utrecht University, Utrecht, NL

Foerster Friedrich Förster studied physics at the RWTH University Aachen (Germany, 1995-2000). During his Ph.D. work at the Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Martinsried, Germany) he used cryo-electron tomography (ET) to study the structures of membrane-associated complexes, pioneering subtomogram averaging as a means to increase resolution (2001-2005). After a postdoctoral stay at the University of California San Francisco focusing on integrative modelling of complexes (2005-2008), he started a research group back at Martinsried. Main themes of the group were the structural characterization of protein biogenesis and degradation at organelle membranes and the development of the necessary cryo-ET software. Since 2016, he is a professor at Utrecht University (Netherlands), continuing these research themes. Most important achievements include (i) developing the first method for subtomogram averaging, (ii) achieving subnanometer resolution for the in situ structure of an asymmetrical complex (ER-associated ribosome) and (iii) determining the atomic structure of the complete 26S proteasome by an integrative approach. He received a Human Frontiers Career Development Award (2012), an ERC Consolidator Grant (2016) and an NWO Vici award (2017) for his research.

N. GRIGORIEFF
HHMI Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, US

abrahams short bio

R.F. LEIRO
CNIO, Madrid, ES

fernandez-leiro Rafael Fernandez Leiro is a Junior Group Leader at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO).
He obtained his PhD in 2011 from the University of A Coruña in Spain where he worked in protein engineering using directed evolution techniques and structure-led rational design. During his PhD, he visited the Rocasolano Institute in Madrid where he was trained in X-ray crystallography. After obtaining the PhD, he joined the Lamers lab at the LMB in Cambridge to work on DNA repair and replication. The timing could not have been better as the cryo-EM “resolution revolution” was happening and the LMB was at the centre of it. For the next six years, he worked with Meindert Lamers and Sjors Scheres to study multiple DNA replication and repair complexes and understand how these systems are regulated using cryo-EM and biochemistry.
He has recently joined CNIO to lead the “Genome Integrity & Structural Biology” group that focuses on the study of the function and biological implications of macromolecular complexes responsible for the maintenance of the integrity of the genome and the role they play in disease.

E. LINDAHL
Stockholm University, Solna, SE

abrahams short bio

P. PENCZEK
Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston TX, US

penczek Pawel Penczek earned his M.Sc. degrees in physics at The University of Warsaw in 1979 for work on the digital contrast enhancement in scintigraphic images. His PhD, earned at The University of Warsaw in 1988, was devoted to the computational analysis of multi-channel electroencephalographic data. In 1989 he became a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Joachim Frank in Wadsworth Center, Albany NY, where he participated in the first cryo-EM determination of the structure of E. coli ribosome. During his tenure in Dr. Frank’s group he contributed novel single particle and electron tomography computational methods to the widely used package SPIDER. These included reference-free alignment of noisy EM images, CTF correction methodology, dual-tilt tomography, and other. In 2000 he became a faculty at The University of Texas, Houston Medical School, where he continued development of computational methodology for high-resolution single particle EM, which led to the establishment of a modern single particle software package SPARX. His current research interests are focused on the identification of conformers in cryo-EM samples and on validation techniques for structure determination by cryo-EM. He is currently a Full Professor, with tenure, at The University of Texas and a co-director of a Structural Biology Imaging Center at the McGavern Medical School.

PN. VOLKMANN
Sanford Burnham Prebys, La Jolla CA, USA

abrahams short bio

53rd Course:

MAGNETIC
CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

Erice 31 May - 9 june 2019

Magnetic Crystallography 2018 logo

Application to Magnetic Crystallography Course deadline:
30 November 2018

Apply

Directors of the course:

B.J. Campbell

B.J. Campbell

Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US

M.T. Fernandez Diaz

M.T. Fernandez-Diaz

Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

J.M. Perez-Mato

J.M. Perez-Mato

University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, ES


PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

Since the first magnetic neutron-diffraction experiments almost 70 years ago (1994 Nobel Prize), magnetic-structure research has grown tremendously within the materials physics, chemistry, and engineering fields (e.g. superconductivity, multiferroics, spintronics, information storage, molecular magnetism). Magnetic degrees of freedom lie at the heart of much of the exciting science being done today at international scattering facilities, and hundreds of magnetic structures are now published every year by a diverse range of research communities. In response to this progress, the crystallographic community is also rapidly developing and delivering new infrastructure with which to solve, refine, analyze and describe magnetic structures. Where chaos once reigned, consensus and remarkable new tools have emerged.

The School will address key advances in magnetic-structure research, as well as the foundational and state-of-the-art of theoretical, experimental, and computational capabilities that made these advances possible. The program, which includes both lectures and many hands-on-tutorials, is designed to engage both new and veteran members of the magnetic-structure community. Scientific topics will include:

1) Important magnetic systems and magnetic-structure types (e.g. commensurate and incommensurate, antiferromagnetic, amplitude-modulated, helical, skyrmionic, etc...);

2) The theory and practice of using magnetic symmetry groups (e.g. point groups, space groups, superspace groups, subperiodic groups) and relating them to magnetic physical properties;

3) The complete and unambiguous description of a magnetic structure; comparison of the correct use of wave amplitudes, magnetic supercells, and representational modes; how magnetic symmetry can be used to further constrain any of these descriptions;

4) Advanced instruments and experimental methods for probing magnetic structures;

5) Computational tools for exploring, solving and refining commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures;

6) Computational tools and resources for performing magnetic representational analyses, applying magnetic symmetry groups, and manipulating the description of a magnetic structure;

7) Open-access archives for commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures.


Sponsored by:


SPEAKERS AND TUTORS

M. AVDEEV
ANSTO, Lucas Heights, AU

avdeev Max Avdeev is an instrument scientist responsible for the high-resolution neutron powder diffractometer ECHIDNA at the OPAL research reactor operated by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). He received PhD for synthesis and crystal structural studies of superionic conductors in 1999. Between 2000 and 2005 he worked as a postdoctoral researcher first at the University of Aveiro (Portugal) and then Argonne National Laboratory (USA). In 2005 he joined ANSTO as a full-time scientist. His main research interests are studies of crystal and magnetic structure of inorganic materials using X-ray and neutron diffraction and atomistic modelling.

L.C. CHAPON
Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK

Chapon Laurent Chapon received is PhD in Montpellier (France) in 2000 and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Argonne National Laboratory (US). In 2002, Laurent moved to the ISIS neutron source (UK) where he worked as an instrument scientist and then leader of the Crystallography group, before joining the ILL (France) as a research fellow and head of the diffraction group. In 2016, Laurent Chapon was appointed director of Physical Sciences at the Diamond Light Source (UK) and visiting Professor at Oxford University. His scientific interests lie in studying the magnetic properties of complex magnetic oxides, mostly multiferroics, frustrated systems, and more recently iridates. Having worked in large scale facilities for the last 18 years, Laurent has extended expertise in neutron scattering, including 3D-polarimetry, and magnetic X-ray scattering as well as magnetic crystallography.

L. ELCORO
University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, ES

Elcoro Luis Elcoro studied Physics at the Universidad Autonoma in Madrid. During his Ph. D. at the University of the Basque Country he focused on the structure determination of quasicrystals under the superspace formalism. Later he extended the use of the superspace to the analysis of families of compounds whose structure details depend on continuous parameters and to the ordered distributions of vacancies. Since 2011 he is one of the developers of the Bilbao Crystallographic Server (BCS). Most of his contributions to the BCS are included in the Magnetic section, devoted to the structure analysis of magnetic structures based on symmetry considerations. At present he is involved in the study of topological insulators using group theory to describe systematically the electronic extended states (band structures). He is also applying the developed methods to the identification of materials that can potentially be topological insulators or semi-metals.

O. FABELO
Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

Fabelo Oscar Fabelo (b. 1978) graduated in Physics at the Universidad de La Laguna, Spain. He did the PhD in the Physics department (2008) at the same University. During this period he was working as technician in the magnetic measurements service of the Universidad de La Laguna, where he took the first contact with the research on magnetism. During the PhD he carried out several stays at Instituto de Ciencia Molecular (ICMol), Valencia (Spain) to improve his background in molecular magnetism. After the PhD from 2009 to 2014, he worked as scientist in the Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (ICMA), Zaragoza (Spain). During this period he was instrument scientist of the neutron powder diffractometer D1B at Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France). Since 2014 he is responsible for the hot-neutron single crystal diffractometer D9 at the ILL.
His research interests are focused on small molecule crystallography, in particular magneto-structural correlations in coordination polymers and hybrid materials. He have an extensive experience on the field of neutron diffraction in both powder and single crystal.

V.O. GARLEA
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, US

Garlea Ovidiu Garlea is instrument scientist at the HYSPEC spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He holds a courtesy appointment with the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University and is adjoint associate professor at the Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering at the University of Tennessee. He received his PhD in solid state physics from Joseph-Fourier University, Grenoble, France in 2001. Since then he has worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the Synchrotron Light Laboratory ELETTRA, at the Ames Laboratory, and at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. From 2007 until 2013, he served as lead instrument scientist at the HB2A Neutron Powder Diffractometer at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) where he oversaw the installation of the instrument and built a vibrant magnetic diffraction community. He initiated a workshop series on magnetic structure determination that runs regularly since 2009. Starting with 2013, he contributed to the successful commissioning of the HYSPEC spectrometer at the SNS and to the implementation of the neutron polarization analysis capability. His research focuses on studies of frustrated magnets, quantum systems and strongly correlated electron systems using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering technique.

M.I.S. HENRIQUES
CAS Institute of Physics, Prague, CZ

Henriques Margarida Henriques was born in Coimbra, Portugal and graduated in Materials Engineering at the University of Coimbra. She worked as a Materials Engineer before she obtained her PhD degree in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Lisbon, Portugal. Her interest in new magnetic crystallography and electronic properties of new materials lead her for her post-doc work within the group of Structure Analysis of the Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences. She is involved in the development of the magnetic option of Jana2006, which concerns systematic data processing and solution of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures. She also works in synthesis and characterization of new materials containing f-elements using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques under multi-extreme conditions. As a part of this work, she stayed at Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France. There she worked as a scientist in the Diffraction group, studying magnetic diffraction in single-crystals of magnetically frustrated materials. Margarida is also involved in the preparation and lecturing in workshops concerning the magnetic option of Jana2006 for scientists and students of worldwide renown neutron facilities and lecturing PhD students in Physics at Charles University in Prague. She is also a member of the Comission for Magnetic Structures of IUCR.

D.D. KHALYAVIN
RAL ISIS Facility, Didcot, UK

Khalyavin Dmitry Khalyavin is a beam-line scientist at the ISIS Facility, pulsed neutron and muon source at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Oxford, UK). He is responsible for the high-resolution cold-neutron diffractometer WISH primarily designed to study large unit cell systems and magnetic ordering in solids. Dmitry joined ISIS in 2008 after completion of his postdoctoral activity at University of Aveiro (Aveiro, Portugal) and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia). He got his PhD degree in condensed matter physics at the Institute of Solid State Physics and Semiconductors of National Academy of Science of Belarus (Minsk, Belarus) in 2002. The main research interest is phase transitions and physical crystallography with a particular focus on magnetic structure determination and crystal structure effects associated with magnetic ordering. Dmitry is deeply involved into the ISIS international user scientific program combined with his own strong research scheme in the field of geometrically frustrated magnetism, multiferroics, iron-based superconductors, heavy fermion metals and Kondo semiconductors.

V. PETRICEK
CAS Institute of Physics, Prague, CZ

petricek Václav Petříček studied physics mathematics and physics at the Charles University in Praha. From 1972 till now he works at the Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Praha. During his one year’s stay in Philip Coppens’s lab he wrote the first version of the program Jana for refinement of modulated structures. Nowadays, after 30 years of development, program JANA serves to about 2000 users as a multi-purpose crystallographic package and it receives 300 citations every year. The latest JANA supports also powder diffraction data, simultaneous refinement against various data sets (powders, single crystals) and radiation sources (x-rays, neutrons, electrons), Time-of-Flight neutron diffraction data and refinement of symmetry deformation modes. The latest research of VP is oriented towards magnetic structures, which can be described using the superspace formalism similarly like modulated structures. The “Crystallographic approach” to magnetic structures has attracted many users from the field. VP also collaborates with his colleague Lukas Palatinus on implementation of refinement procedures for electron diffraction tomography data based on the dynamical theory of diffraction.
For his scientific contribution he has been awarded by ICDD Barrett award in 2013 and the ECA Max Perutz prize in 2016.

J. RODRIGUEZ-CARVAJAL
Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, FR

carvajal Juan Rodriguez-Carvajal has a long experience in diffraction physics of neutrons and x-rays. He is an experimentalist with a strong component in computing and theoretical aspects of diffraction. He got his PhD at the University of Barcelona in 1984 and held different teaching positions in two universities of Barcelona. He got a position as a scientist researcher at the CSIC in the Materials Science Institute of Barcelona. From 1988 to 1994 he was Physicist at the ILL. From 1994 to 2006 he was working at the LLB and he came back to the ILL to lead the Diffraction Group. He has been involved in large scale projects for developing new neutron sources. He has participated in many committees and selection panels for research projects. He has also a strong activity in training worldwide young researchers through many courses on diffraction and crystallography.
JRC's interests:
1. Data analysis and software development in Crystallography and Diffraction Physics.
2. Theoretical analysis of magnetic Structures. Frustration and low dimensional magnetism.
3. Physics of superconducting oxides, intermetallics, metal-Insulator transitions and magnetic ordering. Structural and magnetic aspects of oxides presenting colossal magnetoresistance, charge, spin and orbital ordering phenomena. Energy materials, and multiferroics.
Author of more than 430 papers in scientific journals and books. The number of article citations is more than 17800 (Web of Science), 28000 (Google Scholar).
"Award for Distinguished Powder Diffractionist" from the International Committee of EPDIC (Warsaw, 2008), Barrett Award 2011 of the Denver X-ray Conference for “exceptional contributions to powder diffraction”. Author of FULLPROF, one of the most used powder diffraction computer programs in the world.

T.J. SATO
Tohoku University, JP

sato Taku J Sato is presently a full professor at Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University (Japan). He obtained his MSc from the Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology (1993), and received his PhD from the Department of Physics, University of Tokyo (1996). In 1996, he became a staff scientist at National Institute for Metals in Tsukuba, Japan, and then in 2004 he moved to University of Tokyo as an associate professor. From 2012, he has been at Tohoku University. His main research interest is nontrivial macroscopic quantum phenomena in quantum spin systems, including topological spin textures in the real space, emergent quasiparticles in the quantum disordered state, and so on. His expertise is neutron scattering, and has been an instrument scientist on various spectrometers including backscattering spectrometer, triple-axis spectrometer, and direct geometry chopper spectrometers. He has been a commission member for the magnetic structures of IUCr from 2011.

H.T. STOKES
Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, US

Stokes Harold T. Stokes received a PhD in physics in 1977 at the University of Utah where he developed pulsed-NMR double-resonance techniques for studying atomic diffusion in multi-spin crystals. He then spent three years as a post-doc at the University of Illinois applying pulsed NMR to the study of heterogeneous catalysis. In 1981, he joined the faculty in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Brigham Young University. Three years later, he began a career-long collaboration with Dorian Hatch, and later with Branton Campbell, applying computational group-representation theory to the study of structural phase transitions in crystals. A key product of this effort has been the development of the ISOTROPY Software Suite of online software tools, including the ISODISTORT program. These tools make it possible to conveniently generate and explore the order parameters that arise in phase transitions, and to parameterize them in terms of symmetry modes (basis functions of irreducible representations). The ISOTROPY suite has been a leading contributor of infrastructure for the analysis of commensurate and incommensurate magnetic structures during the past decade.

R.B. VON DREELE
ANL Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, US

Von Dreele Dr. Von Dreele has a BS Chem. E. (1966), and PhD Inorganic Chem. (1971), from Cornell. He was Professor of Chemistry at Arizona State University (1971-1986) and a NSF postdoctoral fellow at the ICL, Oxford University (1972-3) where he began his pursuit of powder diffraction crystallography. He was at Los Alamos National Laboratory (1986-2003) as Instrument Scientist for two neutron powder diffractometers, a Fulbright Fellow at the ISIS neutron scattering facility (1986), received a Los Alamos National Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award (1998), presented the 5th Joseph Morgan Lecture at Texas Christian University (2000), and a Fellow of the MSA since 2001. In 2003 he joined Argonne National Laboratory with a joint appointment between IPNS and APS; in early 2008 he became full time at the APS. He was President of the ACA (2009), received the Barrett (2009) and Hanawalt Awards (2013).
Since 1985, Dr. Von Dreele has developed the widely used software, GSAS, for analysis of both neutron and x-ray powder diffraction data; this package has been cited more than 8000 times. He is the author of some 150 publications which includes the 1st protein structure solved from x-ray powder diffraction data. Most recently he has been developing GSAS-II, a replacement for GSAS with a fully integrated GUI, display graphics and computational analysis system for diffraction data. His main research interests are the development of x-ray and neutron powder diffraction and its application to a wide variety of scientific problems.

A.S. WILLS
University College London, UK

civalleri bio testo

O. ZAHARKO
Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH

Zaharko Oksana Zaharko (b. 1966) obtained a Master of Science in Solid State Chemistry (1987) and a PhD in Chemistry (1990) from the Lviv State University, Ukraine. She worked as a guest scientist in Laboratories of Crystallography in Warsaw, University of Mainz, ETH Zürich. Since 1998 she works at Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging and is responsible for the single crystal neutron diffractometer ZeBRa (TriCS) at the Swiss Spallation Neutron Source SINQ, Paul Scherrer Institut.
Her research interests are frustrated and low-dimensional magnetic systems, and the field of expertise is in neutron scattering and solving complex magnetic structures.

54th Course:

CRYO 3D ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Erice 31 May - 9 june 2019

Directors of the course:

D. Hanein

D. Hanein

Sanford Burnham Prebys, La Jolla, CA, US

S. Ludtke

S. Ludtke

Baylor College of Medicine, Huston, TX, US

S. Raunser

S. Raunser

MPI of Molecular Physiology, Dortmund, DE

Cryo 3d Electron microscopy 2018 logo

Application to Cryo 3d Electron Microscopy Course deadline:
30 November 2018

Apply

PURPOSE OF THE COURSE

The 54th course will be the inaugural School on 3D CryoEM image analysis at Erice. 3D Cryo-EM image analysis refers to the current practices in image processing and analysis both for single particle analysis and tomography. The School aims to provide a current snapshot of this evolving field, complete with workshops demonstrating state-of-the art software. We plan have tutorials on the major software packages practiced in the field to give participants a solid introduction to the software so they are better prepared to complete a more in-depth tutorial on their own. The sessions will include: deep learning, map improvement , GPU and data storage, cellular tomography, sub-tomogram averaging, phase plate and automated data collection.


Sponsored by:

fei

SPEAKERS AND TUTORS

P. ADAMS
Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, US

Adams Paul Adams is a Senior Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and an adjunct Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California Berkeley. He also is Vice President for Technology at the Joint BioEnergy Institute and Director of LBNL’s Molecular Biophysics & Integrated Bioimaging Division. He earned his doctorate in biochemistry at the University of Edinburgh and undertook postdoctoral work at Yale University. Dr. Adams’ research focuses on the development of new algorithms and methods for structural biology, structural studies of large macromolecular machines, and development of cellulosic biofuels. He leads the development of the Phenix software, through a collaboration with researchers from Los Alamos National Lab, Duke University and Cambridge University. Phenix is used for the automated solution of macromolecular structures using crystallographic methods, and more recently has been extended to structure solution, refinement and validation of models obtained from electron cryo-microscopy

W. BAUMEISTER
Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry, Martinsried, DE

Baumeister Wolfgang Baumeister studied biology, chemistry and physics at the Universities of Muenster and Bonn, Germany, and he obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Düsseldorf in 1973. From 1973-1980 he was Research Associate in the Department of Biophysics at the University of Duesseldorf. He held a Heisenberg Fellowship spending time at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, England. In 1982 he became a Group Leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany and in 1988 Director and Head of the Department of Structural Biology. He is also an Honorary Professor on the Physics Faculty at the Technical University in Munich. In 2000 he spent time at the California Institute of Technology as a Moore Distinguished Scholar.
Wolfgang Baumeister made seminal contributions to our understanding of the structure and function of the cellular machinery of protein degradation, in particular the proteasome. Moreover, he pioneered the development of cryo-electron tomography. His contributions to science were recognized by numerous awards including the Otto Warburg Medal, the Schleiden Medal, the John M. Cowley Medal, the Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine, the Stein and Moore Award, the Harvey Prize in Science and Technology and the Ernst Schering Prize. He is a member of several academies including the US National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

J.M. CARAZO
Spanish Natl. Center for Biotechnology, Madrid, ES

Carazo I specialize in what has become to be one of the key “Revolutions” in biology in recent times: Cryogenic Electron Microscopy (cryoEM). This cryoEM "revolution" has been made possible by new developments in instrumentation and in image processing and software; it is, precisely, in the area of information processing where our laboratory has excelled. Indeed, we have opened whole new areas in the field, just naming as examples the successful family of Maximum Likelihood algorithms (developed in Madrid from 2007 to 2011), the very much used EMDataBank (started from the European Union “Bioimage” project that I coordinated), or new methods to calculate local resolution in cryoEM maps, all compiled in our software suites XMIPP and SCIPION. Our current efforts focus on the areas of structural validation and flexibility analysis, two of the most demanding topics in our quest to understand at atomic detail the dynamic of large and flexible biological macromolecules. Naturally, structure is one of the ways to understand biological function, to be necessarily complemented by others, a position that explain our continued efforts in information integration, developing widely used environments like 3DBIONOTES. All our new developments are distributed as public software suites, becoming some of the tools that we use in our role as the Image Processing Center of the European Infrastructure for Structural Biology (Instruct ERIC –for European Research Infrastructure Consortium-).

D. CASTAÑO-DÍEZ
Biozentrum, Univ. of Basel, CH

Castaño Daniel Castaño-Díez completed his PhD in Applied Mathematics in Bonn in 2005 with a study on the efficient use of wavelets for representation of surfaces in computer graphics. After moving to EMBL in Heidelbeg, he started working in computational methods for cryo electron tomography, focusing on the use of GPUs for alignment and reconstruction of tomograms. He started the development of the software package Dynamo during his post-doc in the Center for Imaging and Nanoanalytics of the University of Basel (2009-2013). Later, he entered the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in 2014 as joint Head of the Scientific Computing Unit, working on computational infrastructure for the development of image processing algorihtms. Since 2015, he is a Senior Scientist in the BioEM lab of the University of Basel, where he continues the support and extension of the Dynamo software. His research interests are oriented towards the development of numerical methods for high resolution structure determination in in-situ cryoEM and high throughput content analysis of large tomographic data sets.

J. FRANK
HHMI, Columbia University, New York, NY, US

Frank Joachim Frank is a Professor of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and a Professor of the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from the Technical University in Munich and, in 1975, joined the Wadsworth Center in Albany as a Senior Research Scientist and, in 1985, joined the faculty of the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the newly founded School of Public Health of SUNY Albany. In 2008 he moved to New York to assume his current positions. Dr. Frank's lab has developed techniques of electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction of biological macromolecules. He has applied this technique of visualization to explore the structure and dynamics of the ribosome during the process of protein synthesis.
Dr. Frank is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the American Academy of Microbiology. He is also a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was recently honored for his contributions to the development of cryogenic electron microscopy of biological molecules and the study of protein synthesis with the 2014 Franklin Medal for Life Science. In 2017 he shared the Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences with Richard Henderson and Marin van Heel, and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Richard Henderson and Jacques Dubochet.

F. FOERSTER
Utrecht University, Utrecht, NL

Foerster Friedrich Förster studied physics at the RWTH University Aachen (Germany, 1995-2000). During his Ph.D. work at the Max-Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Martinsried, Germany) he used cryo-electron tomography (ET) to study the structures of membrane-associated complexes, pioneering subtomogram averaging as a means to increase resolution (2001-2005). After a postdoctoral stay at the University of California San Francisco focusing on integrative modelling of complexes (2005-2008), he started a research group back at Martinsried. Main themes of the group were the structural characterization of protein biogenesis and degradation at organelle membranes and the development of the necessary cryo-ET software. Since 2016, he is a professor at Utrecht University (Netherlands), continuing these research themes. Most important achievements include (i) developing the first method for subtomogram averaging, (ii) achieving subnanometer resolution for the in situ structure of an asymmetrical complex (ER-associated ribosome) and (iii) determining the atomic structure of the complete 26S proteasome by an integrative approach. He received a Human Frontiers Career Development Award (2012), an ERC Consolidator Grant (2016) and an NWO Vici award (2017) for his research.

N. GRIGORIEFF
HHMI Janelia Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, US

abrahams short bio

R.F. LEIRO
CNIO, Madrid, ES

fernandez-leiro Rafael Fernandez Leiro is a Junior Group Leader at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO).
He obtained his PhD in 2011 from the University of A Coruña in Spain where he worked in protein engineering using directed evolution techniques and structure-led rational design. During his PhD, he visited the Rocasolano Institute in Madrid where he was trained in X-ray crystallography. After obtaining the PhD, he joined the Lamers lab at the LMB in Cambridge to work on DNA repair and replication. The timing could not have been better as the cryo-EM “resolution revolution” was happening and the LMB was at the centre of it. For the next six years, he worked with Meindert Lamers and Sjors Scheres to study multiple DNA replication and repair complexes and understand how these systems are regulated using cryo-EM and biochemistry.
He has recently joined CNIO to lead the “Genome Integrity & Structural Biology” group that focuses on the study of the function and biological implications of macromolecular complexes responsible for the maintenance of the integrity of the genome and the role they play in disease.

E. LINDAHL
Stockholm University, Solna, SE

abrahams short bio

P. PENCZEK
Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston TX, US

penczek Pawel Penczek earned his M.Sc. degrees in physics at The University of Warsaw in 1979 for work on the digital contrast enhancement in scintigraphic images. His PhD, earned at The University of Warsaw in 1988, was devoted to the computational analysis of multi-channel electroencephalographic data. In 1989 he became a postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Joachim Frank in Wadsworth Center, Albany NY, where he participated in the first cryo-EM determination of the structure of E. coli ribosome. During his tenure in Dr. Frank’s group he contributed novel single particle and electron tomography computational methods to the widely used package SPIDER. These included reference-free alignment of noisy EM images, CTF correction methodology, dual-tilt tomography, and other. In 2000 he became a faculty at The University of Texas, Houston Medical School, where he continued development of computational methodology for high-resolution single particle EM, which led to the establishment of a modern single particle software package SPARX. His current research interests are focused on the identification of conformers in cryo-EM samples and on validation techniques for structure determination by cryo-EM. He is currently a Full Professor, with tenure, at The University of Texas and a co-director of a Structural Biology Imaging Center at the McGavern Medical School.

PN. VOLKMANN
Sanford Burnham Prebys, La Jolla CA, USA

abrahams short bio


Previous Schools

2018 • 52nd Course
Quantum Crystallography
Directors: Dylan Jayatilaka · Piero Macchi

2018 • 51st Course
Electron Crystallography
Directors: Joke Hadermann · Lukas Palatinus · Andy Stewart

2017 • 50th Course
Integrative Structural Biology
Directors: E. Yvonne Jones · Jennifer L. Martin

Future Schools

2020 • 55th Course
Drug design

2021 • 56th Course
Polymorphism

2022 • 57th Course
High Pressure Crystallography

2022 • 58th Course
Diffuse Scattering

Steven Ludtke

ludtke Dr. Ludtke holds the Charles C. Bell Jr. Professorship of Structural Biology in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Baylor College of Medicine, where he directs the CryoEM Core and co-directs BCM's CIBR Center. His Ph.D. (Rice University) and BS (Caltech) are both in Physics, with a focus on molecular biophysics, which led to his development of the EMAN software suite for CryoEM image analysis in the late 1990s. He was awarded the Burton Medal by the MSA in 2008 for these developments. For the last 20+ years his group has focused on CryoEM, CryoET and novel image processing methods development, and EMAN remains one of the most widely used software packages in the field. In co-directing the National Center for Macromolecular for over 15 years, his group has developed biological interests spanning a wide range of systems, including chaperonins, ion channels, LDL/HDL, nuclear pore complexes and the structure of macromolecules within the cellular environment. Recent developments include applications of Deep Learning techniques to CryoEM and CryoET for particle selection and cellular tomography volume segmentation as well as applications of bispectral analysis to dramatically improve 2D image analysis and speed 3D structural refinements.

Maria Teresa Fernandez-Diaz

Fernandez-Diaz Maria Teresa Fernandez-Diaz is the Head of the Diffraction Group at the Institut Laue Langevin in Grenoble (ILL) which exploits eleven unique neutron diffractometers. She received her PhD in Solid State Physics at the University Autonoma of Madrid in 1991, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin in Saclay to develop a single-crystal neutron diffractometer for magnetic studies. In December 1994 she was appointed as Instrument Scientist at the ILL and acquired a large experience in neutron diffraction techniques in powder and single-crystal. Her scientific interest lays mainly in the field of strongly correlated electron systems and in particular the structural and magnetic aspects of oxides presenting charge, spin and orbital ordering phenomena. Progressively she has broadened her interests to different energy related materials as well as to magnetic ionic liquids, studying the correlation of their structural features with their relevant functional properties.

J. Manuel Perez-Mato

Perez-Mato J. Manuel Perez-Mato is one of the founders and developers of the Bilbao Crystallographic Server, a website with crystallographic programs freely available on internet. After more than 30 years as Professor of Condensed Matter Physics at the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao in Spain, he has recently retired. His research interests include the characterization of phase transitions and ferroic materials, and the development of advanced methods in computational crystallography. His work has been especially intensive on the application of the superspace formalism in the investigation of modulated and modular structures. He has been member of the Executive Committee of the IUCr, and of the editorial committees of several scientific journals. His most recent activity has focused on the design of symmetry-based computational tools for the analysis of magnetic structures.

Stefan Raunser

raunser Stefan Raunser was born 1976 in Landau in der Pfalz. He studied chemistry and biology at the Johannes-Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. He prepared his PhD thesis in the group of Werner Kühlbrandt at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt/Main and received his PhD in biochemistry at Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universität Frankfurt in 2004. From 2005 to 2008 he was a postdoctoral researcher in the group of Thomas Walz at Harvard Medical School in Boston, USA and from 2008 to 2013 he was Emmy Noether group leader at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund. From January to June 2014 he was Einstein-Professor for Membrane Biochemistry at Freie Universität Berlin. Since July 2014 he is Director and Scientific Member at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund.

Dorit Hanein

Hanein Dorit Hanein is a Professor at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla, California with adjunct appointments at University of California, San Diego and Institut Pasteur, France. Dr. Hanein received her Ph.D. in Chemistry from The Weizmann Institute, Israel, and pursued a Fulbright postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. David DeRosier at Brandeis University. Central to Hanein’s research is a critical question in cell biology: how do cells employ large, macromolecular machines in cellular processes. Dr. Hanein made seminal contributions to our knowledge of the cytoskeleton and its assemblies, to the development of cellular cryo-tomography of nanomachines in intact cells, and to the evolution of quantitative electron microscopy. Dr. Hanein is a leader in integrating imaging modalities across scales to permit the placement of molecular components of macromolecular complexes into their functional context in whole cells. Hanein’s lab continues to push the envelope in developing, and employing unique set of powerful tools, merging state of the art imaging technologies with sophisticated computational methods, mechanical engineering, cell biology, and protein biochemistry. The resulting quantitative integration of scales between macroscopic cellular behavior and high-resolution structural changes position these efforts at the front end of science with high impact in both medicine and basic biological research.

Branton J. Campbell

Campbell Branton J. Campbell earned an MA in physics and a PhD in materials science at the University of California at Santa Barbara and did post-doctoral research in the Materials Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. He is now a Professor of Physics in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at Brigham Young University in the USA and a former Fulbright Scholar. His current research activities involve group-theoretical analysis of structural order parameters (atomic displacements, site occupancies, magnetic moments, lattice strains) arising from phase transitions, symmetry groups in commensurate and modulated crystals, and experimental x-ray and neutron-scattering studies of structure-property relationships in complex oxides. He is an active co-developer (with Harold Stokes) of the ISOTROPY Software Suite for the application of symmetry groups and representational analysis to solid-state phase transitions, including extensive support for magnetic structures. He currently serves as the vice-chair of the US National Committee on Crystallography and as the chair of the Commission on Magnetic Structure, which recently developed the magCIF standard for communicating magnetic-structure data.